Why Can’t Monaco Be a Literal Roulette Nation

Gambling is one of mankind’s favorite pastimes since time immemorial. It has evolved from the mere religious activities of drawing lots and casting dice to complex games meant for entertainment purposes. This amusing pastime further developed into a form of amusement involving money, in which many struck it rich and went bankrupt for countless generations. Casinos further lifted gambling from this level, creating an outlet where hundreds of gamblers can meet to outmatch each other’s luck.

The casino has truly become popular throughout the centuries. Roulette is one of the games that kept it alive and continuously adapting to the changes brought about by time. Known for its very streamlined design and gameplay, this game has earned the love of many gamblers of various social standing worldwide. Roulette has this popularity that one can’t help but associate it with casinos, being exclusive to land-based gambling establishments and all before casinos went online.

Given this association, one can easily term a certain country that thrives on gambling a roulette nation. Figuratively, this easily applies to the gambling demographic that’s hooked up to roulette. Nevertheless, can an actual roulette nation where the economy has gambling as a major source of income possibly exist?

Well, the only independent state that would probably be fitting of this title is the Principality of Monaco, just of France and a short distance east from Italy. The second smallest country in the world if you don’t count Sealand, Monaco’s tourism-driven economy is dependent on the Monte Carlo Casino, arguably the most popular gambling establishment in Europe and one of the premiere roulette destinations in the world. One can easily say that without this and the country’s railroad, Monaco might as well end up as a full protectorate of France instead of merely contracting the latter for defense.

However, can Monaco be a true roulette nation? With an economy driven by tourism and gambling, why on earth can we say not? Unfortunately though, Monaco simply can’t be one. You see, its gambling industry and tourism industries are two mutually interlinked aspects of its economy – one can’t basically survive without the other. That’s because tourists flock to the city mostly for no other reason than gambling and that the gambling industry thrives only on tourists. The point is that Monaco can’t be a roulette nation because there is no local gambling revenue, which therefore means that there is virtually no Monacan citizen that engages in the vice.

This is all due to the fact that gambling is legally prohibited from the Principality’s citizens. You see, the state considers gambling as domestically counter-productive and is best left as a lucrative business dealt with foreign tourists.

All in all, Monaco can’t be a literal roulette nation. Such should be one where its citizens all engage in gambling and roulette. This can be neither real nor a utopian fantasy however. One can agree that a nation of gamblers will be a state that has zero productivity at best and at worst, an increasingly poor country with continuously shifting domestic wealth.